DIY Travel Guide to National Museum of the Philippines

 Travel Guide to National Museum of the Philippines

 Revisited and Examined [May 2011]

This is NOT a sponsored post. All opinions are mine.



A long overdue post, photo blog session with Ranelle Dial and little Drei, using a compact digital camera. 🙂
Note that in 2011 this website is still under deiville.info (in 2012 I re-branded it to DeiVille.com) hence all the images from this blog post with (dot)info watermarks are all owned by yours truly.
About National Museum
The National Museum of the Philippines is the official repository established in 1901 as a natural history and ethnography museum of the Philippines. It is located next to Rizal Park and near Intramuros in Manila. Its main building was designed in 1918 by an American architect Daniel Burnham. Today, that building, the former home of the Congress of the Philippines, holds the National Art Gallery, natural sciences and other support divisions.

The adjacent building in the Agrifina Circle of Rizal Park, formerly housing the Department of Finance, houses the Anthropology and Archaeology Divisions and is known as the Museum of the Filipino People.” – friendly Wiki

What to see in the National Museum of the Philippines
The museum is housed in two adjacent buildings. One within the boundaries of Luneta Park and the main building along Finance Road.
Both entrance fees are charge a minimum door fees to tourists and visitors, while the students can avail discounts and free entrance to children below three feet. Note that you may not bring in an SLR [Self-Loading Rifle] 🙂  or DSLR [Digital Single-Lens reflex] cameras. Only camera phones and digital cameras are allowed and please turn your mobile phone in silent mode when roaming around the museum. More importantly, the museum is closed every Mondays.

First stop is the the main building [former Congress of the Philippines].

diy travel guide to national museum of the philippines
National Museum of the Philippines
diy travel guide to national museum of the philippinesdiy travel guide to national museum of the philippines

diy travel guide to national museum of the philippines
Art students listens to the museum’s curator
Juan Luna’s Spolarium
diy travel guide to national museum of the philippines
Juan Luna’s Spolarium

diy travel guide to national museum of the philippines

diy travel guide to national museum of the philippines
Finally I’m with Juan Luna’s masterpiece: Spolarium

This room houses paintings of Jose Joya, Manansala and other visual artists. The paintings below were from Jose T. Joya – House of Nikko, 1064, oil in canvass, 172 cm x 198.3 cm

diy travel guide to national museum of the philippinesdiy travel guide to national museum of the philippines
Ranelle Dial,  Bembol Dela Cruz and other contemporary visual artists had a group exhibit in 2008. It houses surreal paintings and installation arts and are remarkably still on  display inside the National Museum, although when we visited the room, it was padlocked and totally in chaos. The room was filled with dust and cobwebs, we tried to look for an authorized person who can unlock the door, apparently the security guards knew nothing. The museum last year was under-construction. I remember my sister saying the museum is always under construction, the hallways and elevator of the building that time looks terrible and unappealing.  As I was composing this, the website [http://www.nationalmuseum.gov.ph/] is having viewing errors. I was excited to browse for “The National Museum – 360-degree Virtual Tour” online, looks like its still under construction. 🙂
diy travel guide to national museum of the philippines
diy travel guide to national museum of the philippines
hallway to National Museum’s 3rd Floor
diy travel guide to national museum of the philippines
The adjacent museum in Agrifina Circle of Rizal Park [former Department of Finance] safe-keeps the Anthropology and Archaeology Divisions. This area typifies the culture-hype Philippines, perhaps the popular destination of student’s educational tours. One can learn to give a true meaning how rich the Philippine archipelago is, in terms of natural resources, creativity of the natives, abundant wild life and history unfolds.
diy travel guide to national museum of the philippines
diy travel guide to national museum of the philippinesdiy travel guide to national museum of the philippines
The Ifugao House and Landscaping [presented by Petron Corporation] Fhaley Ad Henenga. An Ayangan House from Mayaoyao, the Ayangan heritage is a sub-group of the Ifugao people. Made from heavily thatched roof serves as protection against the rains and cold weather of the region. If you’re into geocaching, this spot right here is famous for it. We were able to find a hidden cache assigned in the given GPS location.
diy travel guide to national museum of the philippinesdiy travel guide to national museum of the philippines
More relics of preserved exotic animals.
diy travel guide to national museum of the philippines
preserved Philippine Eagle
diy travel guide to national museum of the philippinesdiy travel guide to national museum of the philippines
The Philippine Eagle is also known as monkey-eating eagle. It has brown and white-coloured plumage, and a shaggy crest, and generally measures 86 to 102 centimetres (2.82 to 3.35 ft) in length and weighs 4.7 to 8 kilograms (10 to 18 lb). Among the rarest, largest, and most powerful birds in the world, it has been declared the Philippine national bird. It is critically endangered, mainly due to massive loss of habitat due to deforestation in most of its range. Killing a Philippine Eagle is punishable under Philippine law by twelve years in jail and heavy fines.
diy travel guide to national museum of the philippines
diy travel guide to national museum of the philippines
diy travel guide to national museum of the philippines
diy travel guide to national museum of the philippines
Chinaware and ceramics from Ching Dynasty
Griffin Shipwreck
Pilas Group of Island, Basilan
diy travel guide to national museum of the philippines
Above: A shell midden and native’s urn
diy travel guide to national museum of the philippinesdiy travel guide to national museum of the philippines
diy travel guide to national museum of the philippines
Butuan Boat
Written records in countless history books have always claimed that the Philippines, being an archipelago, had an extensive and ancient maritime culture. No physical evidence for the presence of boats used for the open waters was available to support this idea until the major discovery of prehistoric boats in Butuan in 1978. Pothunters in search of the famous Chinese ceramics buried in the city, revealed several pieces of wood –  certainly of no value to collectors. However, the “worthless” timber turned into a major boon for the study of Philippine Prehistory, providing proof of the ancient boat-building technology of the early Filipinos as well as their participation in the regional maritime activities of Southeast Asia.
When the news of the discovery reached the National Museum, a team was sent to excavate the water-logged materials. Eight boats were discovered, three being excavated with dates 320, 1250 and 990 AD. Archeologists identified the boats as “balangay“, mentioned by historians like Alcina and Scott, and various Chinese chroniclers. One of the Butuan boats has been preserved and reconstructed for public display in the National Museum.”
diy travel guide to national museum of the philippinesdiy travel guide to national museum of the philippines
diy travel guide to national museum of the philippines
Astrolabe [hanging navigator]
Bronze before 1590
diy travel guide to national museum of the philippines
Salapa [Lanao del Sur]
Nganga [Cigarette} container
diy travel guide to national museum of the philippines
Pandanan Shipwreck
diy travel guide to national museum of the philippinesdiy travel guide to national museum of the philippines
In 1993, scuba divers from a pearl farm discovered large ceramic jars off the coast of Pandanan Island in Palawan. Underwater archeologists revealed the presence of a Southeast Asian trading vessel loaded with tradeware ceramics, dating to the 15th Century. This re-creation of the Pandanan excavation illustrates how archeologists conduct research underwater. Wooden rafts built as working platforms were  moored over the wreck, serving as storage, power sites, and housed the compressed air for scyba gear. Underwater excavation was guided by a centerline used as a reference point for measurements. A movable square grid was applied to record the location of each  archeological specimen recovered and photographs were taken using special equipment. A diver excavates using a vacuum hose generated by water pump while another diver inspects the seabed cleared by the vacuum.”
diy travel guide to national museum of the philippines
ancient canon balls were made of stones. Note that we did not allow her to touch anything from the museum, we strictly guided her, she just have that fascination with marbles =)
first books published
diy travel guide to national museum of the philippinesdiy travel guide to national museum of the philippines

Update:
As of August 2018, the National Museum of Fine Arts is finally completed. I have some photos posted over at our Facebook Page (DeiVille) just in case you want to see the upgrade they made.
http://www.nationalmuseum.gov.ph

Full Disclosure:  No business relationship involved with any company or organization promoting the place and its entity. We paid for our entrance fees
*deville.info has been sold to a third party, any images with deiville.info watermarks (can be access originally from deiville.blogspot.com upon request) is copyrighted by Green Dei of deiville.com.

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